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Naijatreks | The Coconuts of Lagos Lagoon- Tourism, Trails & Potentials
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The Coconuts of Lagos Lagoon- Tourism, Trails & Potentials

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The setting sun beams a blanket of vibrant reflections across the shimmering lasgidi  waters, as alternating chains of mangrove swamps, coconut trees, sand-filled beaches and man-made structures lace the Lekki and Ikorodu banks of the redoubtable Lagos Lagoon”

As I sail from the remote end of the lagoon near Epe, down to the Five-Cowrie Creek in Victoria Island, a mosaic of contrasting beauty bedeck the Lagoon shores: uncountable jetties and shanties of bamboo and timber protrude from waterside rural communities, patches of sand-filled plots serving as soccer fields in some places, transiting into long stretches of fairly pristine mangrove and rainforests, which is gradually swallowed up by a longer stretch of beautifully painted and styled homes of the affluent, extending all the way down to the overtly congested Lagos Island.

In the bosom of these waters live rare and endangered species of numerous aquatic animals, some of which have been ignorantly poached and accidentally killed by the fishing equipments of artesian fishermen.

All these, accumulate to paint a pithy picture of the vast relatively unexplored potentials, lurking away in the Lagos Lagoon and the shores of the Lekki Peninsula.

IMG-20120105-00376-The Pavilion Waterside Club, Lekki Phase 1, Victoria island, Lagos.

A recent survey among some average working class individuals within the Lagos metropolis  presents some very interesting results.

Most respondents claimed to pay frequent visit to the lagoon and averred that they often meet an average of 60-100 people lurking around the lagoon shores: some cycling, some strolling, some waiting to board a boat crossing the lagoon, some just standing and enjoying the breeze etc.

Some responders from different sophisticated waterfront facilities along the lagoon observed that their facilities record at least 120 visitors every month, among whom 21-40% are foreigners. It is also worthy of note that most responders complained about the high cost of tourism services are at the few existing waterside facilities.

Numerous residents of Ajah area in Victoria Island had been reporting sightings of numerous wild animals within their estates ranging from crocodiles, monitor lizards, monkeys, parrots, herons etc. These are certainly not meant to be seen as threats to human habitation, rather, they are to be seen as ripe potentials for ecotourism on the Lekki Peninsula. (Find photos sent to us by some of the residents below).

All these reports and many more shows how lucrative the Lagos Lagoon is for tourism investments.  Nevertheless, the peak of tourism fruitfulness and prolificacy in Nigeria is the stage at which the most desired tourism products and services in Nigeria are affordable and easily available to the average Nigerian. This is our passion and this is our future.

IMG_3120 -A local jetty at rural riverine community near Epe, Victoria Island, Lagos

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IMG_3123 -A marvelous view of the Lagos Lagoon from the Ajah flank of the Lagoon (Ikorodu at the other side)

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IMG-20120121-00469 -The jetty of the Civic Centre Aquamarine Club, Victoria Island, Lagos.

IMG-20120121-00472 -Aquamarine Club, VI, Lagos.

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-The Pavilion Waterside Club, Lekki Phase 1, Victoria island, Lagos.

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-The Pavilion Waterside Club, Lekki Phase 1, Victoria island, Lagos.

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This article was written by Folarin Kolawole

Founder of Naijatreks, Nigerian-born Folarin Kolawole is a geologist, travel writer and researcher. When not at work, he travels the length and breadth of Nigeria, exploring, taking photos and writing about her numerous hidden tourist potentials.   'Naijatreks' is a product name registered under the Ntreks brand, which is also duly registered by Nigeria's Federal Corporate Affairs Commission. The contents on this blog are re-usable. However, it must be ensured that it is linked back to this blog, and correctly attributed to Naijatreks or the author. Please do not edit, rewrite or commercialize the original works on this blog without direct and written permission from the Founder (Folarin Kolawole). For inquiries and advert placement on the blog, kindly contact us at info@naijatreks.com or naijatreks@gmail.com.

2 comments:

socererFebruary 13, 2012 at 10:05 pmReply

Spellbinding

Victoria Island Gone Wild: Another Bundle of Nuisance or Tourism Potential? | NaijatreksFebruary 19, 2012 at 1:14 pmReply

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